Mareike Transfeld: "Yemen’s transition to political stability was doomed to fail. Here’s why."

28.10.2015

Fighters loyal to Yemen’s exiled president, Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi, stand on top of the al-Qahira Castle, located on the highest mountain in Yemen’s third city Taez, after they seized it from rebel fighters on Aug. 18. (AFP/Getty Images)

Fighters loyal to Yemen’s exiled president, Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi, stand on top of the al-Qahira Castle, located on the highest mountain in Yemen’s third city Taez, after they seized it from rebel fighters on Aug. 18. (AFP/Getty Images)
Bildquelle: The Washington Post

Last week, Yemen’s exiled government in Riyadh agreed to talks with the Houthis, a social movement and militia from northern Yemen, in an attempt to move the country out of conflict. It remains highly unlikely, however, that the country will get back on track of stabilization, much less the political transition process — initially seen as a model for peaceful transition.

In the past seven months, in order to restore the transitional government in Sanaa, the Saudi-led coalition has attempted to push the Houthis out of territories and state institutions it had been occupying since September 2014, albeit with limited success. [...]

 

Read the full blog post on The Washington Post's "Monkey Cage" blog.

 

The article is the result of Mareike Transfeld's previous work as research fellow at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs, the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik.